Posts Tagged ‘rotoscoping’

How 3D films are made

I came across this really interesting article on how several recent 3d films have been put together and thought I’d share!

http://www.fxguide.com/featured/art-of-stereo-conversion-2d-to-3d-2012/

 

MPC – Revisioning Clash of the Titans

I remember going to the the old school Harry Hamlin flick when I was a kid, and, when I heard about the remake, I thought the same as a lot of people – BAD IDEA.  Then I saw it – sans 3D on Blu-Ray – and I did a complete 180.  Maybe it didn’t hold up for some critics, but I was more than pleased.  So, just in case you were wondering, here’s some of how they made it happen.

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Man, it must be awesome to have a team like that.

New Compositor Portfolio Live

Comp Header

Per my previous post, just finished getting the redesigned Compositor Portfolio online.  Here’s the link

http://www.vfxjake.com/compositor.html

Keeping with the one page format, once again, I moved away from the JQuery and focused more on a design/CSS based site.  I almost added a photo gallery, but, being that the focus is on compositing, a video only gallery seemed sufficient.  Check back soon as I’ll be uploading a the 2011  Comp Reel soon.  Next up is Editing. 3D, and Graphic Design with a heavy dose of Choices in between!

The Dyer’s Eve Film Project – VFX Breakdowns

Just uploaded these to add to the new compositing site.  Brings back memories for sure.

Paint by Numbers – After Effects CS5′s Roto Brush

While working towards the completion of Choices, I had the opportunity to test drive the recently released After Effects CS5 in all its 64 bit glory.  The ability to utilize all installed RAM in my system to render previews and final comps was a stark contrast to the days of enabling “Render Multiple Frames” and the disk cache and pushing After Effects to “see” at least 3 GB of RAM.  The program runs like a dream and, at present, without major hiccups.  All that being said, this isn’t a review or song of praise for the program itself; that recognition goes to one of the software’s new features – the Roto Brush.

If you’re like me and you’ve spent countless hours with your face inches from the screen as you meticulously move clusters of mask points ever so slightly frame by oppressive frame, the Roto Brush is a godsend.  That being said, roto is still roto.  The tool is no point-and-click silver bullet that turns what were previously multi-hour rotoscoping sessions into instantaneous clean mattes.  It’s still a frame-by-frame process, but brushing the mask edges as opposed to slowly adjusting clusters of points does seem to be a more intuitive process.

This being said, the Roto Brush is worth its weight in gold for the time it saves during the rotoscoping process.  Just don’t expect instantaneous miracles.  Now if they could just enable real-time video editing in After Effects . . .

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